Diversifying audiences

About

diversifying audiencesThe composition of media audiences and their everyday practices have traditionally been central themes in media and communication studies. The key issue is untangling how, and in what circumstances, audiences are attributing meaning to their media consumption.

At the moment, we are more than ever confronted with an ever-broad pallet of choices when it comes to composing a cross-media diet, or repertoire. Although audiences have always been confronted with multiple alternatives, the number of options has become virtually unlimited.

More substantially, the separations between media have sublimed, as well as the clear-cut lines between media producers and audiences (i.e. produsage, participation), the demarcation between online and offline, and the boundaries between what is private and public. This fundamentally challenges media researchers in grasping audience practices.

The compositions of audiences vary greatly: they interact with an abundance of (user-generated) media texts, available through a multitude of technologies and platforms, nested in various social, spatial, temporal, and emotional contexts (e.g. mobile media). Hence, audiences’ evolving interfaces with cross-media repertoires are a focal point of attention, in theoretical, methodological, and managerial terms.

Projects

Team

Key publications

  1. Courtois, C., De Marez, L., & Verdegem, P. (2014). The composition and role of convergent technological repertoires in audiovisual media consumption. Behaviour and Information Technology.
  2. Courtois, C., Mechant, P., & De Marez, L. (2012). Communicating creativity on YouTube: what and for whom? Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 15(3), 129–134.
  3. Courtois, C., Mechant, P., Ostyn, V., & De Marez, L. (2013). Uploaders’ definitions of the networked public on YouTube and their feedback preferences: a multimethod approach. Behaviour and Information Technology, 32(6), 612-624.
  4. Courtois, C., & Mechant, P. (2013). An evaluation of the potential of Web 2.0 APIs for Social Research. In G. Patriarche, H. Bilandzic, J. L. Jensen, & J. Jurisic (Eds.), Audience research methodologies : between innovation and consolidation (pp. 212–224). Routledge.
  5. Courtois, C., Mechant, P., Paulussen, S., & De Marez, L. (2012). The triple articulation of media technologies in teenage media consumption. New Media & Society, 14(3), 401–420.
  6. Courtois, C., Mechant, P., & De Marez, L. (2012). Communicating creativity on YouTube: what and for whom? Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 15(3), 129–134.
  7. Courtois, C., Verdegem, P., & De Marez, L. (2013). The triple articulation of media technologies in audiovisual media consumption. Television & New Media, 14(5), 421-439.
  8. Schuurman, D., Courtois, C., & De Marez, L. (2011). New media adoption and usage among Flemish youngsters. Telematics and Informatics, 28(2), 77–85.

Contact

Further questions?

Contact Prof. dr. Lieven De Marez