2010

Digita

About

The Digita project gauges to the degree of digitalisation in various federal research institutions. The research focuses on both type of material as well as collection. Goal of the project is to identify the needs and expectations of those organisations, as well as the initiatives already taken. A quantitative survey and qualitative in-depth interviews are at the foundation of this needs and expectations analysis.

Duration of the project

The project runs from 01/02/2010 - 31/05/2010.

Staff involved

  • dr. Laurence Hauttekeete

Clusters

  • Media Production & Distribution

Financed by

  • Federal government

FLEET - An interdisciplinary research project on Flemish e-publishing trends

About

FLEET is financed by the IWT within the framework of the programme to support Strategic Basic Research (SBO). The research consortium consists of junior or senior researchers from the social sciences, law and economic departments of the VUB, KULeuven, Ghent University and the Dutch research bureau Infonomics/ECDC.

The main objective of the project consists of identifying and understanding the changing role of publishers, journalists and users in the digital media environment. Working from this perspective will allow the mapping of the most important ‘drivers of change’ in the field of electronic publishing. More specifically, the project has five inter-related general aims:

  1. To map the developments and most important actors in the field of electronic publishing in Flanders and the analysis of the strategies and business models employed.
  2. To examine the changes in employment opportunities in the e-publishing sector and the changing role, function and working conditions of journalists, with special attention to the new competence requirements and skills for the digital journalist.
  3. To understand user behaviour with regard to new online products and services, with special attention to the blurring of the boundary between producers and consumers of content (the user as producer).
  4. To research the most important legal problems in the field of electronic publishing, particularly with regard to copyrights and liability.
  5. To translate the interdisciplinary research results into concrete policy recommendations, legal manuals, suggestions for business modelling, workshops and an e-journalism course, etc.

Duration of the project

The project runs from 01/03/2006 - 01/03/2010.

Clusters

  • Media Production & Distribution

Financed by

IWT

Kemmelberg website

About

Cultural heritage is our social capital, our collective memory. It’s a priceless source of knowledge, creativity and identity. The digitalisation trend makes these sources accessible for everyone and makes new, interactive applications possible. Heritage which is accessible and re-usable, forms nowadays and in the future a permanent base for (public) services of the managing institution. New Flemish regulations promote the cultural disclosure of archives, libraries and documentation centers, the permanent disclosure of cultural heritage and the development of expeditions from historical-cultural importance. For this reason local governments and heritage organizations try to improve their communication with the public and therefore they invest in new or contemporary disclosure systems.

An example of a contemporary disclosure system is the creation of a website which contains a lot of documentation and information on the archaeologically rich heritage of the Kemmelberg. By request of the Ename Expertisecentrum for heritage disclosure MICT will conduct preparatory research for the establishment of a website around the rich archaeology of the Kemmelberg. Three target groups are taken into account: the municipality Heuvelland, youth/education (teachers or students) and relevant and interested organizations. A website me not remain an empty box and the existence depends on the interest of several types of users. In this preparatory research wishes and desires, opportunities and treats, as well as particular features will be revealed. They will be of great importance for the eventual creation of the website.

Duration of the project

The project runs from 01/01/2010 - 30/04/2010.

Staff involved

  • Katrien Berte

Clusters

  • Media Production & Distribution

Financed by

  • Contract research

Evaluation of heritage multimedia exhibits

About

The ICOMOS Ename Charter, a widely accepted international document on the presentation and interpretation of cultural heritage sites, emphasizes the importance of a (continuous) assessment of heritage presentation and interpretation techniques and strategies. This short-term project reviews under these guidelines three different on-site multimedia presentations using a survey and contextual research.

Duration of the project

The project runs from 01/06/2010 - 31/12/2010.

Staff involved

  • dr. Peter Mechant

Clusters

  • ICT & Society

Financed by

  • Contract research

PING - Poverty is not a game

About

Poverty remains one of the most important problems faced by our Western society today. Hence, it remains an important field of action for the King Baudouin Foundation. A major task in the battle against poverty is raising awareness: as many groups in society as possible must be sensitised concerning what it means to be poor. This is best done via channels and in a language that suit the target group. Computer and video games are presently the ideal channel for reaching out to young people. Since their creation, they have grown from a niche into a creative and mainstream culture product for youth. Consequently, the King Baudouin Foundation, in close collaboration with the Interdisciplinary Institute for Broadband Technology (IBBT), is investing in developing a game for use in schools that focuses on the experience of what it means to be poor.

Publications & References

De Grove, F., Van Looy, J., & Courtois, C. (2010). Towards a Serious Game Experience Model: Validation, Extension and Adaptation of the GEQ for Use in an Educational Context. In L. Calvi, K.C.M.Nuijten, H. Bouwknegt (Eds.), Playability and player experience (pp. 47-62). Breda, Netherlands: Breda University of Applied Sciences.

Neys, J., Van Looy, J., De Grove, F., & Jansz, J. (2012, 24-28 May). Poverty is not a game: Behavioral changes and long term effects after playing PING. Proceedings of the Conference of the International Communication Association, Phoenix, Arizona, USA.

De Grove F., Van Looy J., Neys J., & Jansz J. (2012). Playing in School or at Home? An Exploration of the Effects of Context on Educational Game Experience. Electronic Journal of e-Learning, 10 (2), 199-208.

Duration of the project

The project runs from 01/01/2009 - 31/12/2010.

Staff involved

  • Prof. dr. Jan Van Looy
  • Frederik De Grove

Clusters

  • Gaming and Immersive Media Lab

Financed by

  • Other

Related content

SEGA - Self-representation/self-experience in games

About

Since the 1980s, video gaming has steadily grown in popularity and moved from the cultural periphery toward its mainstream. Recent studies indicate that up to 75%of Belgian teenagers regularly play games and last year’s sales of video games have surpassed those of music. Despite this popularity,however, and the relative longevity of the medium – Space War, which is generally seen as the first computer game, was programmed in 1962 – video games as a medium and gaming as an activity remain underrepresented in academic research and, compared to other media, its specific characteristics little understood. With the emergence of the field of game studies around the turn of the millennium and similar movements in other disciplines, games took their first steps on the research stage, but, whilst these attempts have been commendable and important, the methods employed were generally derived from research into other media and therefore unsuited for studying the specific qualities of the gaming experience.

In recent years, this hiatus has been recognised and a growing amount of research has been aimed at understanding the specificity of the gaming experience. A number of studies, such as Brown & Cairns (2004) for example, which deals with the experience of game immersion, have identified the main parameters involved in feeling present in a game environment. Sweetser and Wyeth (2005) have adapted Csikszentmihalyi’s well-known ‘flow framework’ so that it can be used for analysing and describing the experience of playing video games. By breaking it down into eight elements – concentration, challenge, skill, control, goal structure, feedback, immersion and social interaction – they have taken a significant step toward a framework that can help to understand the enjoyment of playing video games and identify potentially successful game forms. Ravaja et al. (2006) and De Kort & IJselsteijn (2008), finally, have described video gaming as a situated experience and thus underlined the importance of specific spatial and social parameters such as the presence of other players or an audience.

One factor that is rarely taken into account, however, is the self-representation and self-experience of the player in the game. One of the unique characteristics of play is that it reserves a role for the person taking part in it (which can sometimes be observed in the fact that the player will refer to their in-game identity as ‘I’). This role can be strictly determined by the game (as in highly linear firstperson shooters or action adventure games such as Tomb Raider) or it can be more open as in simulation games such as The Sims, role-playing games like The Elder Scrolls or action-adventures such as Grand Theft Auto. Moreover, some game genres such as casual and puzzle games do not seem to put forward any specific role at all other than the requirement to accept the goal structure of the game as your own.

Research design

In the Sega project we will analyse the factors determining how a player experiences their own role in a game-environment, how it is negotiated between the player’s own views and beliefs on the one hand and the role foreseen for them in the game on the other, and we will look into the consequences this bears upon their overall gaming experience. This research will be broken down into two parts. On the one hand, we will study how a specific role is shaped and embedded in game play (selfrepresentation) which can involve factors as diverse as platform, narrative, interface and controls(witness the success of the Nintendo Wii controllers). On the other hand, we will look into how the player experiences their own role, their ‘imagined self’, and how this influences the various other factors involved in the overall game experience such as immersion, the sense of involvement, the feeling of flow and how his relates to overall game enjoyment. The general aim of the project is to identify and describe the parameters involved in shaping the self experience, to analyse how they relate to one another and to evaluate the potential for improving future game experiences through new formats and technologies.

Publications & References

Van Looy, J., Courtois, C., De Vocht, M., & De Marez, L. (2012). Player Identification in Online Games: Validation of a Scale for Measuring Identification in MMOGs. Media Psychology, 15 (2), 197-221.

Van Looy, J., Courtois, C., & De Vocht, M. (2014). Self-Discrepancy and MMORPGs: Testing the Moderating Effects of Avatar Identification and Pathological Gaming in World of Warcraft. In S. Kröger, T. Quandt (Eds.), Multi-Player: The Social Aspects of Digital Gaming.

Duration of the project

The project runs from 01/01/2009 - 31/12/2011.

Staff involved

Prof. dr. Jan Van Looy

Clusters

Gaming and Immersive Media Lab

Financed by

iMinds

TV 3.0

About

This project involves a study to the most optimal financing models for the private broadcasters in Flanders. In addition, it investigates the most optimal relationship between the four most popular broadcasters (i.e. providing audiovisual programmes that generate the most traffic over the distribution infrastructure) in a market on the one hand and the distributors on the other hand. Based on a cross-national, comparative research design (Denmark, United States and Flanders), concrete recommendations for the policy-making will be provided.

Duration of the project

The project runs from 02/08/2010 - 18/11/2010.

Staff involved

  • Tom Evens

Clusters

  • ICT & Society

Financed by

  • Contract research

Charter to tools

About

This project examines how the ICOMOS Ename Charter principles can be used to develop "interpretation and presentation'-tools within an integrated and sustainable heritage policy and aimed at the specific context of maritime and marine heritage.

The ICOMOS Ename Charter provides the basic objectives and principles for the interpretation and presentation of sites and sees them as integral part of heritage conservation. The charter also contributes to a broad public appreciation for cultural heritage sites. This is done by considering heritage sites as places and resources for the study and the reflection on the past and as valuable resources for sustainable community development.

Within this project we wish to operationalize the ICOMOS Ename Charter to the context of 'wet', maritime or marine heritage, taking into account all contextual factors that are linked to it. Maritime heritage includes several aspects that are seldom approached together. Anyone who tells a story about maritime heritage, must take into account these different contexts: there are not only ships but also the shipyards, the archaeological sites and the museums where the oldest vessels are displayed. The domain is complex. Yet the story about maritime heritage becomes really fascinating when we can tell it from that complexity.

Duration of the project

The project runs from 01/02/2010 - 30/04/2010.

Staff involved

  • dr. Laurence Hauttekeete
  • dr. Peter Mechant

Clusters

  • Media Production & Distribution
  • ICT & Society

Financed by

  • Contract research