Research Projects

Divorce in Flanders

Ethnic minority entrants into the labour market: the role of social capital

Gender and depression in Europe. Analyzing gender differences in depression from a cross-national comparative perspective

Family formation and partner migration

HISSTAT. Construction and development of a database of 19th and 20th century statistical information at the local level (municipalities and...

The modernization of the Western World. An international comparative analysis of marriage partner selection (1800-1913)

Stigma and mental illness in a cross-national perspective

Stigma as a barrier to effectiveness of mental health care?

Transmission of values in immigrant communities: looking for the relationship between the social network and acculturation processes of...

Underestimation of work-family conflict

Divorce in Flanders

Divorce in Flanders is an interacademic (UA, KUL, VUB, UGent, SVR) research project, financed by FWO-SBO. The project aims to get insight in the causes and consequences of family dissolution. Therefore, we compare ever-divorced people with those who are still in their first marriage. Divorce and separation are multi-facet life-events, involving different actors (partners, parents, children, care providers, lawyers,...), and affecting many aspects of life. The data for the project is collected in a multi-actor perspective giving information on both spouses, a child and the parents of both spouses, resulting in a high-standard large-scale database. The study focuses on the following topics: demographic characteristics, partnership, parenthood, social networks, socio-economic factors, well-being, service use, divorce processes and cultural orientations.

Promoter: Piet Bracke

Contact: Elien Colman, Sara Symoens

www.scheidinginvlaanderen.be

 

Ethnic minority entrants into the labour market: the role of social capital

The research wants to explain the quantitative and qualitative lag of ethnic minority entrants into the Flemish labour marktet by the structural inequality of accessed and used social capital in searching a job.

Promoter: Bart Van de Putte

Contact: Pieter-Paul Verhaeghe

 

Gender and depression in Europe. Analyzing gender differences in depression from a cross-national comparative perspective

Using data from the ESS-round 3, the prevalence of depression is estimated among a sample of women and men from 23 European countries. Depression is modelled using confirmatory factor analysis and cross-national variation in the gender ratio in depression is estimated using the most appropriate factor model. Cross-national differences in depression and in the gender gap in depression are studied from a macrosociological perspective.

Promoter: Piet Bracke

Contact: Sarah Van de Velde

 

Family formation and partner migration

The aims of the project are on the one hand to measure partner migration from non EU-countries and on the other hand to grasp the specific dynamic of these migration flows. By applying the proposed method, it becomes possible to define indicators which determine the size of diverse types of partner migration and to provide policy makers with a scientific basis to assess the needs of integration trajectories within the targeted group

Promoters: John Lievens, Frank Caestecker, Bart Van de Putte

Contact: Bart Van de Putte

 

HISSTAT. Construction and development of a database of 19th and 20th century statistical information at the local level (municipalities and supra-municipal contexts)

Promoter: E.Vanhaute (Nieuwste Geschiedenis, UGent), I.Devos (Nieuwe Geschiedenis, UGent), R.Van Rossem (sociologie, UGent), H.Reynaert (Politieke wetenschappen, UGent), B.De Rudder (Geografie, UGent), K.Neels (Interface Demography, VUB), S.Gadeyne (Interface Demography, VUB), P.Deboosere (Interface Demography, VUB).

http://www.hisstat.be

Co- promoter: Bart Van de Putte

 

The modernization of the Western World. An international comparative analysis of marriage partner selection (1800-1913)

Sociologists widely believe that modern western societies are meritocratic, which translates into social mobility and marriage mobility. This is not confirmed by much empirical evidence and only now, with the availability of large databases, we can examine the issue in a more systematic way. The research objective is to investigate whether or not there was a general and gradual increase in marital mobility by social origin in the 19th-century. Based on a series of large-scale international historical demographic databases, this proposal aims at refining the underlying theoretical insights regarding the modernization of the western world. This research is build upon a series of comparative studies to test the various hypotheses: a) test of the ‘thesis of industrialism’ in early industrial cities; b) test of the context specific fluctuation (urban crisis hypothesis, economic modernization in context); c) alternative hypotheses (demographic class formation hypothesis, romantization and pillarization hypothesis). Besides this substantial focus, there is also a methodological issue, namely the further implementation of the SOCPO-scheme (Van de Putte & Miles, 2005), a social power class scheme. This is a unique, flexible and validated tool as it can be applied to various societal contexts using information on both occupation and property.

Promoter: Bart Van de Putte

Contact: Nina Van den Driessche

 

Stigma and mental illness in a cross-national perspective

This study forms a part of a cross-national comparative study about stigmatization, with as a major aim the formulation and testing of a multidisciplinary multilevel model. By means of standardized face-to-face interviews in a representative sample of the general population in 25 countries, the ideas, attitudes and behavioral intentions against persons with mental health problems are compared.

Promoter: Mieke Verhaeghe

Contact: Elise Pattyn

 

Stigma as a barrier to effectiveness of mental health care?

This study investigates the extent to which the stigma of mental illness can be considered as a barrier for the effectiveness mental health care organizations in Flandres. Furthermore, it explores the impact on the effectiveness of the mental health care system by linking stigma with (differential) service use, using international data.

Contact: Mieke Verhaeghe

 

Transmission of values in immigrant communities: looking for the relationship between the social network and acculturation processes of second and third generation Turks

This research aims to shed light on the way in which second and third generation Belgian Turks negotiate the paradoxical demands from the host society and their own ethno cultural community, and on how living in these two ‘worlds’ is reflected in norms and values. Research on intergenerational transmission of values suggests that the cultural distance between the cultures of origin and the new society can lead to intergenerational disagreement and hence non-transmission of values. It is also suggested however that this relationship is dependent on the tightness of the ethno cultural social network, which in itself is related to socioeconomic hardship: immigrants with a low socio economic position, especially the ones with collectivistic norms and values, tend to ‘stick together’ in order to survive both economically and socially. In this research I therefore not only ask how and if values are transmitted from Turkish parents to their children, but also how the composition and characteristics of their social network plays a role in this process. The research focuses specifically on the role of social control in tight networks, and on the impact of discrimination – as a specific indicator of the socio economic position of ethno cultural minorities – on the acculturation processes of Belgian Turks.

Promoter: Bart Van de Putte

Contact: Klaartje Van Kerckem

 

Underestimation of work-family conflict

This research aims at uncovering whether work-family conflict (WFC) and its consequences for well-being are underestimated in research. This underestimation can be caused by both intrinsic as methodological reasons. Given that women still more often experience WFC and consequences of WFC for their well-being than men, gender issues will also be taken into account.

Intrinsic features of WFC that may lead to underestimating are the use of coping strategies that have disadvantageous side effects for the well-being (of women in particular) and the ‘lagged adaptation’ causing women to feel (implicit) social pressure to keep on performing their traditional roles as much as possible while also having a paid job.

Methodological issues can also be expected to lead to underestimation of the WFC-problem. Prevailing gender ideologies, which can (partially) explain this ‘lagged adaptation’, may also lead to a (unconscious) social desirability bias. Further, a non-response bias can be expected: given the observations in international research that both WFC as time pressure are increasing, non-respondents might just be those who are too busy to participate because of the difficulties in balancing work and family demands.

Promoter: Bart Van de Putte

Contact: Anina Vercruyssen