Text, Image, Sound: Intermedial Crossings in Twentieth-Century Mass Media

Level - Target audience

PhD-Students working on (different) twentieth-century media from various disciplines (Arts, Humanities and Communication Sciences)

Organiser

Zoë Ghyselinck
Faculty: Faculty of Arts and Philosophy
Department: Department of Literary Studies, German Literature Section
E-mail: zoe.ghyselinck@ugent.be

This specialist course on “Intermediality and Mass Media” is organized by Ghent University’s Research Group 20th-Century Crossroads (20cc), the Centre for Literary and Intermedial Crossings (CLIC at VUB), the Centre for Visual Poetics at the University of Antwerp, and MDRN at the Catholic University of Leuven.

Organising & scientific committee

Prof. Maaheen Ahmed (Department of Literary Studies, Ghent University)
Dr. Zoë Ghyselinck (Department of Literary Studies, Ghent University)
Prof. Janine Hauthal (Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies, Vrije Universiteit Brussel)
Dr. Cedric Van Dijck (Department of Literary Studies, Ghent University)
Prof. Birgit Van Puymbroeck (Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and Department of Literary Studies, Ghent University)
Prof. Gertjan Willems (Department of Literary Studies, University of Antwerp and Department of Communication Studies, Ghent University)

Scientific Committee

Prof. Maaheen Ahmed (Department of Literary Studies, Ghent University)
Prof. Sascha Bru (Department of Literary and Cultural Studies, Catholic University of Leuven)
Dr. Sébastien Conard (KASK; Graphic Design, LUCA School of Arts)
Dr. Zoë Ghyselinck (Department of Literary Studies, Ghent University)
Prof. Janine Hauthal (Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies, Vrije Universiteit Brussel)
Prof. Anne Reverseau (Institut des Civilisations, Arts et Lettres, Université Catholique de Louvain)
Dr. Cedric Van Dijck (Department of Literary Studies, Ghent University)
Prof. Birgit Van Puymbroeck (Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and Department of Literary Studies, Ghent University)
Dr. Pim Verhulst (Centre for Manuscript Genetics, University of Antwerp)
Prof. Gertjan Willems (Department of Literary Studies, University of Antwerp and Department of Communication Studies, Ghent University)

Abstract

Parallel to the development of mass media in twentieth-century Western cultures, there has been an ever-increasing interest in examining media from the perspective of intermedial crossings within and between other media. Since the 1990s, the study of intermediality has given rise to a heterogeneous and sometimes confusing variety of approaches and gained interest from various disciplines ranging from literary and cultural studies to art history and communication studies. This three-day intensive course aims at helping young scholars to explore, define and apply intermedial approaches that are useful for their study of twentieth-century literary, artistic, and cultural practices.

Topics

Since the second half of the nineteenth century, technological innovation in European and North-American cultures has given rise to the development of new media, such as photography, radio and film. Likewise, new reproduction techniques have transformed visual and print culture allowing them to reach mass audiences. During the last decades, intersections between new media and already existing, ‘established’ media have attracted scholars from various disciplines and have opened up new approaches in the field of intermediality that pay attention to the continuity of media forms and the articulation and re-articulation of media through shifts and adjustments in social and cultural contexts.
This three-day intensive course aims at exploring media in twentieth-century Western societies against the backdrop of their cultural and medial contexts and from a systematic and historical perspective. In theoretical lectures and via case studies, specialists and doctoral students will actively discuss intermedial crossings between text, image, and sound, their sociohistorical context and intended audiences.

Format

This intensive course is divided into four parts. Each part elaborates on intermedial relationships between text, image, and sound in literature and mass media, such as periodicals, radio, and film, which are discussed from a variety of methodological and sociohistorical perspectives. The intensive course aims (1) to stimulate reflection on assessing mass media from a broader cultural (sociohistorical, religious, …) perspective; (2) to help doctoral students understand and apply various methodological approaches and terminologies of intermediality; and (3) to tackle aesthetic functions of the relationship between text, image, and sound in twentieth-century media. It is preceded by a keynote lecture focussing on literature and media innovation in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Objectives

After completion of the course, PhD-students
1. will have gained insights into the intermedial dynamics shaping various (new) media.
2. will be able to identify and assess media as material means of interaction or as cultural institutions interrelated with other key social institutions.
3. will have gained knowledge of a number of theories and different approaches to the study of intermediality, and the ability to use these theories and approaches for the analysis of literature, and other media.
4. will be able use methodological concepts on intermediality, remediation, transmediality, etc. adequately.
5. will be able to instigate scientific discussion through presentations and pitches.
6. will be able to assess intermediality as a fundamental category or condition on the one hand or as a critical category for the analysis of specific individual media on the other.
7. will be challenged to broaden their network (and networking skills) across national and international institutions.

Timing and Dates

Dates: 28-29-30 April 2021   Online-course (ZOOM)

Program

Wednesday 28 April, 2021 Thursday 29 April, 2021 Friday 30 April, 2021
Morning session
(09:00–13:00)

09:00–09:15: Welcome & Introduction

09:15–09:45: Lecture Prof. Paolo Favero (Antwerp): "Journeying in Post-Digital Visualities: from VR/MR/AR to Byzantium via Buddhist Philosophy"

09:45–10:15: Q&A

10:15– 10:45 Break

10:45–13:00 (with break): Two parallel breakout rooms

A. Specialist Feedback session: (max.) 6 students present work-in-progress (ca. 10 min.) and get feedback from Prof. Favero (ca. 10 min. each)

B. Reading session (Chair: Prof. Maaheen Ahmed, 20cc). Chapters 3 and 4 ‘Labor and Anima’ and ‘Disobedient Machines’ from Scott Bukatman’s The Poetics of Slumberland: Animated Spirits and the Animating Spirit (University of California Press, 2012)

09:00–09:15: Welcome & Introduction

09:15–09:45 Lecture Prof. Peter Buse (Liverpool): “Photography and Play (and Periodicals)”

09:45–10:15: Q&A

10:15– 10:45 Break

10:45–13:00 (with break): Two parallel breakout rooms

A. Specialist Feedback session: (max.) 6 students present work-in-progress (ca. 10 min.) and get feedback from Prof. Buse (ca. 10 min. each)

B. Reading session (Chair: Dr. Cedric Van Dijck, 20cc): Excerpts from Eric Bulson’s Little Magazine, World Form (Colombia UP, 2016)

Lunch break

13:00-13:45

13:00-13:45

Afternoon session
(13:45–17:30)

13:45–14:15: Lecture Prof. Alexandra Saemmer (Paris 8 / VUB): “Pollination, Hybridization and Colonization in Electronic Literature: A Socio-Semiotic Approach”

14:15–14:45: Q&A

14:45–15:15: Break

15:15–17:30 (with break): Two parallel breakout rooms

A. Specialist Feedback session: (max.) 6 students present work-in-progress (ca. 10 min.) and get feedback from Prof. Saemmer (ca. 10 min. each)

B. Reading session (Chair: Prof. Birgit Van Puymbroeck, 20cc): Excerpts from Jason Camlot’s Phonopoetics: The Making of Early Literary Recordings (Stanford UP, 2019)

13:45–14:15: Lecture Prof. Gabriele Rippl (Bern): “New Developments in Intermediality and Ekphrasis Studies”

14:15–14:45: Q&A

14:45–15:15: Break

15:15–17:30 (with break): Two parallel breakout rooms

A. Specialist Feedback session: (max.) 6 students present work-in-progress (ca. 10 min.) and get feedback from Prof. Rippl (ca. 10 min. each)

B. Reading session (Chair: Dr. Zoë Ghyselinck, 20cc): Excerpts from Bauduin and Johnsson: The Occult in Modernist Art, Literature, and Cinema (Palgrave 2018) and from Jeremy Stolow: Deus in Machina: Religion, Technology, and the Things in Between (Fordham UP, 2013)

VUB_
Kick-off Lecture / Concluding remarks
16:00–17:00: Lecture by Prof. Alexandra Saemmer (Paris 8; VUB): “Electronic Literature and Mass Media: Pollination, Hybridization and Colonisations”
17:00 – 17:30: Discussion

17:30–17:45: Concluding Remarks

17:30–17:45: Concluding Remarks

Registration fee

Free of charge

Registration

Please follow this link: https://eventmanager.ugent.be/textimagesoundtwentyone

Teachers

  • Prof. Alexandra Saemmer
    Affiliation: Information and Communication Sciences Paris 8 University (France) / Lorand Chair ‘Intermediality’ (CLIC/VUB, February – May 2021)
    Prof. Saemmer is Associate Professor of Information and Communication Sciences at University Paris 8. Her current research projects focus on semiotics and aesthetics of digital media, reading and writing in digital environments. She is the author and editor of several books and articles on digital literature and arts.
  • Prof. Gabriele Rippl
    Affiliation: Department of English, University of Bern (Switzerland)
    Prof. Gabriele Rippl is Full Professor and Chair of Literatures in English and North American Studies and Director of the Department of English. She has done research on intermediality (text-image relations and ekphrasis) in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Anglo-American literature, graphic novels, cultural studies, and history and anthropology of the media.
  • Prof. Peter Buse
    Affiliation: University of Liverpool, School of the Arts
    Peter Buse is Professor and Dean of the School of the Arts at the University of Liverpool. He is an expert in intermediality, having published widely on (and at the intersection of) periodical studies, critical theory, drama studies, photography and visual culture. Buse is founding and executive member of the European Society for Periodical Research.
  • Prof. Paolo Favero
    Affiliation: University of Antwerp, professor in Visual and Digital Culture. He is also member of the Visual and Digital Cultures Research Center (ViDi).
    Prof. Favero is working across visual and digital cultures and anthropology. He has published widely on emerging technologies, visual and sensory ethnography, arts-based methods and existential anthropology.

Number of participants

Maximum 24 participants

Evaluation criteria (doctoral training programme)

100% full attendance of the three-day event.
Active participation in the form of one work-in-progress presentation (ca. 10 min.).
A short research statement (2000 words) which the students should submit three weeks in advance (in order to enable the experts to give detailed feedback).