Geert Peeters presents PhD on Modelling the Degenerative Adaptation of the Liver Vasculature and Perfusion in Cirrhosis

Here you can see a figure in which the large and small blood vessels  of a healthy rat liver are reconstructed in 3D based on vascular casts. (large view)

Here you can see a figure in which the large and small blood vessels of a healthy rat liver are reconstructed in 3D based on vascular casts.

(20-12-2017) Wednesday, December 20th 2018, Geert Peeters presented his PhD. Congratulations!

 

The PhD focuses on liver cirrhosis, which represents the end-stage of different liver disorders.  Since cirrhosis is an irreversible liver disease that is often caused by excessive alcohol consumption, over-consumption of high-fat foods or chronic liver inflammation. Currently, (patient) treatment of cirrhosis is not yet possible due to a lack of knowledge about how cirrhosis affects the blood vessels and the functioning of the liver as the disease progresses.Thus, a liver transplant remains the only therapeutic option when the disease reaches an advanced stage.

The main aim of this thesis was therefore to conduct fundamental research into the development of cirrhosis, in which we specifically wanted to quantify the extent to which the blood vessels of the liver were affected, and what the effect of these changes was on the blood circulation of the liver.  

In this doctoral research Geert Peeters described the development of a number of techniques to make 3D reconstructions of both large and micro vessels of the liver from scanned casts of livers and microscopy images of tissues. These techniques were used for a unique detailed analysis of the progressive degression of the liver in a rat model of cirrhosis. The resulting data then formed the basis of a computer model to simulate blood circulation through the rat and to estimate the effects of cirrhosis on the rest of the circulatory system.

Doctoral advisors:
prof. Patrick Segers, vakgroep Elektronica en Informatiesystemen - prof. Wim Laleman (KU Leuven) - prof. Charlotte Debbaut, vakgroep Elektronica en Informatiesystemen