The Psychosocial Impact of Irregular Migration and Human Trafficking on Young Refugee Women

PhD student: Sarah Adeyinka
Summary: Trafficking in persons is the second largest form of illegal trade in the world, grossing an estimated $150 billion annually, with over 40.3 million people enslaved worldwide. Coupled with increased demands by migrants to get to Europe at all costs, trafficking in persons has become an even more profitable trade with high returns. This research addresses the journeys of young, refugee women entering Europe via the central Mediterranean route. It focuses on the psychosocial impact of human trafficking and this irregular journey on young refugee women, their wellbeing, and both visible and invisible losses.
PhD in Educational Sciences
Promoter(s): Ilse Derluyn
Starting date: January 2018