Lezing | Frank Keating: Researching ‘race’, poverty and mental health: An intersectional approach

Wanneer
26-02-2019 van 10:00 tot 12:00
Waar
LESLOKAAL 1.2, H. DUNANTLAAN 2, 9000 GENT, FACULTY OF PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATIONAL SCIENCES
Voertaal
Engels
Contact
swsp@ugent.be
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2019-02-26-frank-keating

This presentation will explore how research can be used as a tool to draw out the intersections between poverty, mental health and 'race' as social inequalities in social work research. It will draw on a photo voice project that aimed to give voice to black men who are particularly marginalized and stigmatized in the United Kingdom (UK). There are well-documented disparities for black men in the UK, which spans their general life experiences, their experiences in mental health services and their experiences in recovery. This intractable situation has persisted for decades. The aims of the project was to find ways of encouraging black men to talk about emotional well-being in a nonmedicalised way and to capture their narratives about how they construct well-being. Nineteen men agreed to participate in the project and all gave ermission for their photos to be used in reports and presentations.

The project was underpinned by critical race theory, intersectionality theory and insights from the work of Frantz Fanon. I will use the findings to illustrate how these theoretical insights helped to give voice to a marginalized group, the challenges encountered both during and after the project. I will specifically highlight the challenges for doing research that offers a counter narrative, attempts to promote social justice and the positioning of the researchers in relation to the participants.

Frank Keating is Professor of Social Work and Mental Health in the Centre for Social Work, School of Law, at the Royal Holloway University of London. His research focuses on themes of diversity, inequality, justice and power, and contemporary professionalism in an increasingly complex and globalized nature of practice. Key research topics include the critical examination of services engagement with diversity, such as responses of mental health services to ethnicity, gender and inequalities, and the experiences of groups, communities and individuals that are often marginalized in social services. A developing area of work is a concern with cultural competence, which looks at ways of working with people across different cultures but also understanding their experiences, and strategies to challenge injustices in day-to-day experience. Recent publications include Parental mental health and black children (2016), and Racialised communities, producing madness and dangerousness (2016).

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