PUBLICATION - Kristin Van Damme on news repertoires

(30-11-2017) Researcher Kristin Van Damme author of three articles on news media repertoires in Participations, Themed Section: News Consumption across Europe.

Over the last three years, Kristin Van Damme had been part of an international news research project, which now resulted in a Themed Section on News Consumption across Europe in Participations. In the themed section, audience researchers from twelve (mostly European) countries report on a joint comparative research project about repertoires of news consumption and their democratic implications.

Kristin contributed to the themed section with an article on the Flemish repertoires and two comparative articles across nations.

In Flanders Fields: News media repertoires in Dutch-speaking Belgium

Van Damme, K. (2017). In Flanders Fields: News media repertoires in Dutch-speaking Belgium. Participations, 14(2). 301-323.

The presented article is part of an international study on news use and outlines seven Flemish news media repertoires. To examine these repertoires, an integrated mixed-method approach was adopted, combining an in-depth qualitative analysis of 36 in-situ interviews with a guiding Q-analysis. This Q-sort technique required the informants to sort 36 types of news media outlets on a bi-polar dimension ranging from “does not play a role in my life” to “plays an important role in my life”. The Flemish news media repertoires are each characterized by a specific type of news user: (1) the Quality seeking traditionalist, (2) the Quality seeking cosmopolitan, (3) the Digital up-to-dater, (4) the Headline-based snacker, (5) the Critical omnivore, (6) the Sports lover and the (7) Collateral user.

Comparing European citizens’ news media repertoires across nations: a second-order factor analysis approach to explore cross-national patterns

Van Damme, K., Kobbernagel, C. & Schrøder, K. C. (2017). Comparing European citizens’ news media repertoires across nations: a second-order factor analysis approach to explore cross-national patterns. Participations, 14(2). 437-463.

A shift towards a more global audience culture is currently being pushed by the increasingly widespread digital, mobile and social media used for news consumption and internationalization of the news markets. However, while living in an increasingly globalized newsscape, audience members are still situated in a local community, and relate to a (oftentimes linguistically anchored) regional and national context for news consumption. To some extent, therefore, news consumption repertoires, can be argued to ‘territorialized’ in such a way that they come to systematically vary from country to country. This study reports from an empirical investigation across nine European countries of how nationally anchored news consumption repertoires are both shaped by the national cultures and by trans-border processes, exploring to what extent we can speak about transnational news repertoires. Methodologically, the study performs a second-order Q-methodological factor analysis of the national news repertoires mapped in the country-specific analyses reported in this special issue.

Cross-medial news usage in the Dutch-language region: a comparative study of news repertoires in the Netherlands and Flanders

Van Damme, K. & Swart, J. (2017). Cross-medial news usage in the Dutch-language region: a comparative study of news repertoires in the Netherlands and Flanders. Participations, 14(2). 484-503.

This study explores how news users in Flanders and the Netherlands navigate the increasing supply of news in the digitalised media landscape, specifically considering how they combine various news media into distinct news media repertoires. Employing interviews combined with a card-sorting exercise (N=72), five Dutch and seven Flemish news repertoires are observed, each reflecting a different way that news is of value in people’s everyday life. Moreover, combining data from both countries, the study discovers seven news repertoires transcending national borders. However, all but one of these configurations are heavily dominated by either Flemish or Dutch news users. Thus, we conclude that despite comparable media systems and a common language, both countries patterns of news usage still show considerable variation.