Welcome to Sara Lembrechts, PhD researcher on children’s rights and asylum

(29-09-2020)

Sara LembrechtsWelcome to Sara Lembrechts, PhD researcher on children’s rights and asylum

In September 2020, Sara Lembrechts started a PhD in children's rights and asylum with the Migration Law Research Group. Under the supervision of Prof. Ellen Desmet, she will investigate the role of children's rights in asylum procedures before the Council for Alien Law Litigation (Raad voor Vreemdelingenbetwistingen or CALL). More specifically, this project will examine how children's rights are perceived, mobilised and practiced by the actors involved in these procedures - not only by the judges of the CALL, but also by children and adolescents, their parents or guardians, lawyers, representatives of the asylum authorities in the first instance, and other relevant professionals.

The project starts from a multidisciplinary framework that combines legal and ethnographic research methods. In this way, the research aims to contribute to the field of critical children's rights studies, paying particular attention to how children's rights are shaped by children and adolescents themselves, as well as by children's interaction with other groups. The research is embedded in the Human Rights Centre and CESSMIR of UGent.

Sara holds a Master's degree in Children's Rights & Childhood Studies (Berlin, 2013), an LLM in International Law (Maastricht, 2011) and a Bachelor's degree in European Studies (Maastricht, 2009). Prior to her PhD, she worked as a researcher and policy advisor at the Children’s Rights Knowledge Centre (KeKi, 2012-2020). She was also involved in several research projects on children's rights and international child abduction (University of Antwerp, 2016-2020), resulting in a number of publications on these topics.

Contact:

sara.lembrechts@ugent.be 
T 09 264 69 53
Sara's profile on the website of the Migration Law Research Group
This research on the website of the Human Rights Centre
This research on the website of CESSMIR

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